Flint in the Field

My Guest Poet does not know she is accorded this honour.

Serendipity led me to the most amazing poem about everything that is ‘field’. This is the kind of poem I aspire to write and utterly confirms why it won its author the Cardiff International Poetry Prize in 2008.

The poet’s name is Rose Flint.

I met Rose’s daughter who was speaking on the dynamics of successful marketing at a networking meeting in Newbury. During her introduction, she made passing reference to her mother - Rose Flint - casting her (and other professional poets like myself) as a strange and rare breed. Indeed! I made a note, mainly because her daughter mentioned her mother’s success in catching attention of the BBC Radio 4. It happened I was in the middle of gathering my herd of poems to live in ‘The Field of All Fields’. And this is what the Google produced when I did a search: Rose Flint on YouTube reading ‘The Field’.

An added bonus is Rose’s introduction to the poem about sustainability, health and how our ‘now’ shapes the future. I echo every word and the tenor of her words. The Field presents a striking metaphor. Enjoy!

What’s the music which takes me to the fields and to horses? Horses hooves, whinnies and that soft welcome not-quite-whinny that Hurricane made when I arrived home from being away. And, too, these two tracks - one which sang through my childhood via the TV Series ‘On White Horses’. This acoustic version is used as the intro and outro to the poem tracks.

The other track is fa fa la Belem’s 'Vermelho’ in which - on the version I have and not the one I’m linking to - you can hear bells on bridles as horses dance to this liberating anthem. I dance to it regularly at home to lift my spirits. I sense the possibility of what it is to be a noble creature. I also use it in Biodanza for an exercise called ‘The Horse’ when we do, actually, dance it as horses!

 

So, who lives in the Fields?
Apart from Phil the sheep farmer who occasionally pops in for a cup of coffee and a chat, I’m inclined to include Philip Larkin, and the others I’ve mentioned elsewhere - Paul Kingsnorth with farming neighbours in his Irish equivalent, Linda Kohanov (writer of The Tao of Eqqus), Berkshire Farriers who looked after Hurricane’s hooves and all horse whisperers, especially The Khadikov riders from Kazakhstan who took Hurricane (now named Han into their family). There are others. Some live in a neighbouring estates - ‘Marthe’s Place’ - which we’ll go to another time…

And perhaps you? Do you love to stride the fields or soak up a wide expanse of hedged or wooded fields? Please, consider yourself an inhabitant and stay a while in the Wild Poplars ‘Field of All Fields’. You can listen and download all the poems here, for free.



The Field of All Fields

The Field of All Fields